constant velocity model

Anything about geophysics and geoscience: jobs, events, technical or general discussions ...
Post Reply
RaSaaLa
Silver Member
Silver Member
Posts: 14
Joined: Tue Aug 18, 2020 8:02 am

constant velocity model

Post by RaSaaLa »

What is a constant velocity model geology? examples?

User avatar
geophix
VIP Member
VIP Member
Posts: 933
Joined: Fri Jul 24, 2009 9:26 am

Re: constant velocity model

Post by geophix »

It probably means the wave velocity in the model doesn't change, such as a homogeneous media. If you provide more context, probably we can understand better about the question.

glionameghan
Member
Member
Posts: 2
Joined: Mon Dec 28, 2020 5:07 am

Re: constant velocity model

Post by glionameghan »

In physics a constant velocity model is used to determine the trajectory and speed of single point particle, or the center of mass of a rigid or rotating body, that is subject to zero net applied force or torque. The '’’net force’’’ has to be zero. This does not mean the absence of any force, only that the vector sum of all forces acting on the particle or mass must be zero, that causes motion with a constant acceleration along one coordinate.

For motion with constant velocity, the acceleration is a = 0. (dv/dt = 0). In integral form it is: v(t) = v(i) = constant. The integral is trivial, then the position against time can be considered, the velocity becomes the integral form of this model: x(t) = x(i) + v(i)t. In this formula the initial time - the time when the position and velocity equal x(i) and v(i) are regarded as t = 0.

For a moving particle, at constant velocity, is moving at time t(i) and is moving towards another object at t=0 then to have constant velocity with initial conditions at t(i) then: x(t) = x(i) + v(i) {t-t(i)}

GuyM
VIP Member
VIP Member
Posts: 644
Joined: Sat Mar 24, 2012 11:35 pm

Re: constant velocity model

Post by GuyM »

Sure, but in seismic data processing it usually means that we are assuming that the p-wave (and possibly s-wave) seismic velocity of the Earth is constant. That's not a great approximation, however it can be useful under some circumstances, especially when developing or testing algorithms.

Post Reply
  • Similar Topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post